About Us

Wallace Arnold Travel established itself on the high street over 70 years ago and it is this wealth of experience that ensures our customers return to us time and time again.


We began as a tour company in 1920, established by Wallace Cunningham and Arnold Crowe and started operating continental tours in 1933, with our retail operations starting later on. We opened our first hotel, The Trecarn in Babbacombe, Torquay in 1945 and we've only continued from there!


We pride ourselves on our friendly service and our priority is to make certain all your travel arrangements are stress and trouble-free. When you come in-store you'll be talked through every aspect of your booking by our experienced and knowledgable agents who will ensure that your break is exactly what you want it to be. Our stores can be found in locations across Yorkshire, as well as one shop in both Chesterfield and Mansfield.


As a leading travel agent, we deal with all major tour operators like Jet2 Holidays, Tui, P&O Cruises and Butlins so you can enjoy every part of the great quality holidays these operators offer. Added to that we are part of Specialists Leisure Group, who count the UK's largest escorted tour company, Shearings as part of the family, making us a specialist in coach, river and escorted touring holidays.

   
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Why Wallace Arnold Travel?

We have a long history of providing superb escorted tours to destinations across the world. When you come in-store, you'll be talked through each part of your tour by our experienced travel agents.


So whether you've already got your heart set on a particular country or resort, or you want to find the destination that suits you best, our agents are waiting to help you find your next holiday.


With the added assurance of 100% financial protection through ABTA and being a retail agent for only ATOL protected tour operators – your holiday is in safe hands.

Benefits from choosing a local agent

Expert knowledge

Guidance and advice

Convenient and hassle-free

Complete booking service